Higher education / alumni publications

While working at Northwestern University's law school in the mid-2000s, I created a new alumni publication focused on alumni profiles. Since then, I've written consistently for university alumni magazines, with institutional clients including Northwestern, the University of Chicago, the University of Illinois, the University of Illinois at Chicago, Illinois Institute of Technology, DePaul University and Pratt Institute. 

Free Flowing

We live in an age of analytics, when seemingly everything can be measured, parsed, and optimized using data science and mathematical modeling. The approach is so ingrained that it’s difficult to imagine a time when even scientific disciplines lacked that quantitative underpinning—yet that was the case when Charles Haas (BIOL ’73. M.S. ENVE ’74) studied at Illinois Tech in the early 1970s. An undergraduate biology major from New York City, Haas was skilled and interested in both biology and math...

[Cover story] Go Where There Is Light: For President Frances Bronet, Leadership is a Process of Illumination

Dawn is just breaking over Brooklyn and Frances Bronet is already hard at work. But she’s not an insomniac, nor has she pulled an all-nighter—she’s just an exceptionally early riser. She has no need for an alarm clock. Each morning before the rest of the world stirs, she takes her first cup of coffee and then climbs aboard her elliptical machine to begin taking care of emails, reading articles on ...

[Cover story] Reforming the Law of Evidence in Tanzania

Ten law students had spent at least one full academic year immersed in the history and workings of the Tanzanian legal system, and now, finally, they were gathered in late April 2014 on the shores of Lake Victoria, dining with the justices of Tanzania’s highest court. As the hosts feted their guests, a breeze rolled in off the lake and the sun slipped behind the palm trees. It felt like a reward for a job well done. At that point, “there was just no way to comprehend the significance of what we were there to do,” said Katy Pine (JD ’15), one of the students. ...

Building the Future

THE ASSIGNMENT: This cover story for the University of Chicago's Harris School of Public Policy magazine begins with the surprise announcement of a major gift and evolves into a profile of the donors, Dennis and Connie Keller. THE LEAD: Harris students, faculty and staff gathered in the school’s cafe on the afternoon of November 5 without knowing why they’d been called together. There was a good sign, though: champagne. One student grabbed a flute from the server’s tray, saying, “If we have to toast to something, I want to be ready.”

Points of Discovery

AQUA IS ALL MOTION. The Chicago skyscraper’s rolling curves and fluid energy are a striking addition to the city—an expressive, twenty-first century entry into the most exclusive section of Chicago’s skyscraper pantheon. The building’s success since its completion in 2009 has transformed not only Chicago’s skyline, but also the reputation of the building’s chief architect, Jeanne Gang. Gang already was a rising star, but she is now fully arrived...

Reinventing Interventions

FM radio is big in Douentza, Mali, where most of the 28,000 locals are loyal listeners who tune in regularly. The on-air programming in this remote town just south of the Sahara Desert is uniquely Malian, with a musical emphasis on traditional indigenous instruments such as the lute-like kora and the dunun drum. Much of the music features a call-and-response style that retains a central role in Malian culture and is famous for influencing American blues and rock ’n roll. But if you’re looking for a rock ’n roll attitude from the latest hit record in Douentza, you won’t find it. Check out these lyrics from a current song in regular rotation: "Parents listen well to this message, it will serve you well | 'No' to [female genital mutilation] is a decision from the highest authorities of Mali Health Works ..."

Raising One of His Own

A 44-year-old woman lies unconscious on an operating table, head tilted toward her right shoulder, every inch of her body covered by blue fabric except for a triangular opening into her brain that shines brilliant red. The operating room in the University of Illinois Medical Center at Chicago is dark, cold, quiet and relaxed as a team of doctors enters the fifth hour of the woman’s surgery to clip multiple aneurysms in the woman’s brain.